June 5, 2015 ALEX NAGORSKI



There are a lot of reasons to be excited for the 69th Annual Tony Awards this Sunday. Hosted by Alan Cumming and Kristin Chenoweth, this year’s ceremony recognizing the best of Broadway will make for a lavish show. Featuring appearances by stage royalty like Bernadette Peters and Sutton Foster, celebrities like Rose Byrne, Bradley Cooper, and former host Neil Patrick Harris, the Tonys will also boast its largest production number ever. More than 175 performers will join singer Josh Groban for a medley of tracks from his new album of Broadway classics, Stages.

As for the coveted Best Musical prize, the showdown will be between the intimate and hauntingly beautiful Fun Home (which we reviewed here) and the all-around brilliant, hilarious and blockbuster Something Rotten.

The Tony Awards also signify the end of the current Broadway season. Below, take a look at some of the most creative shows currently playing, and be sure to grab your tickets now. Some may become impossible to see after Tony’s success and some may close in their wake. Either way, this was one of the most daring seasons in recent years – and that in itself is something to be celebrated.

It Shoulda Been You

STARRING Tyne Daly, Chip Zien, Sierra Boggess, David Burtka, Harriet Harris, Lisa Howard, Montego Glover, Adam Heller, Nick Spangler, Edward Hibbert, Josh Grisetti, Michael X. Martin, Anne L. Nathan

WHERE Brooks Atkinson Theatre


STORY It’s Rebecca (Boggess) and Brian’s (Burtka) wedding day, and their polar opposite families have gathered to celebrate the impending nuptials. But when a few surprise guests – including Rebecca’s neurotic ex-boyfriend (Grisetti) – show up, all bets are off and mayhem ensues. What deep secrets will be revealed? And what will they mean for the couple when it’s time to walk down the aisle?

WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT Don’t let the Tony Awards snub fool you. This David Hyde Pierce-directed show is a laugh-out-loud satire and adorable exploration of love and family that turns the conventional wedding day comedy inside out. Think Meet The Parents mixed with a Jewish spin on My Big Fat Greek Wedding and the romantic musical chairs of The Family Stone. You’ll be smiling throughout this entire one act show.

STANDOUT SCENE The soulful song, “Jenny’s Blues,” finds the bride’s sister, Jenny (Howard) finally standing up for herself to her family. It’s the show’s biggest number and Howard cements herself as a rising star to watch with her powerhouse vocals and passionate delivery. See for yourself when she performs the song at this Sunday’s Tonys.

An American In Paris

STARRING Robert Fairchild, Leanne Cope, Max von Essen, Brandon Uranowitz, Jill Paice, Veanne Cox

WHERE Palace Theatre


STORY Inspired by the 1951 MGM film, An American In Paris tells the story of three men – two American soldiers and a local Parisian – vying for the affection of the same French woman. Through the music and lyrics of George and Ira Gershwin, this quartet must navigate the city of love right after World War II.

WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT Simply put, the dancing is nothing short of breathtaking. Tied with Fun Home for the most Tony nominations this year, this show is a visually stunning homage to the musicals of the Golden Age. It looks and sounds like a classic, making it the perfect show to reintroduce previous and older generations of Broadway fans to contemporary theater.

STANDOUT SCENE The show’s climax, a triumphant 14-minute ballet, is unlike anything on Broadway today. It’s impossible not to marvel at how meticulously choreographed and flawlessly executed this sequence is. It’s not often that an audience gives a standing ovation before the curtain call, but in this case, it is more than warranted.

The Visit

STARRING Chita Rivera, Tom Nelis, Mary Beth Peil, Rick Holmes, Matthew Deming

WHERE Lyceum Theatre


STORY The world’s richest woman, Claire Zachanassian, returns to her impoverished hometown after fleeing it decades ago. Her mission: to exact revenge on those who had wronged her in her youth. Her homecoming challenges the moral core of the town and asks the eternal question: how far are we willing to betray our humanity when offered a glimpse of previously unimagined riches?

WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT Not only does the show mark the Broadway return of the legendary Chita Rivera, it’s also the final collaboration of the prolific writing team of John Kander and Fred Ebb. Frequent Kander and Ebb performer (and muse) Liza Minnelli best noted how monumental this is in her recent USA Today op-ed: “To give you an idea of the kind of impact they had, at least one Kander and Ebb show has been running on Broadway during 41 of the last 50 years. This year alone, there have been three. Their work will live on in revivals until the end of time, of course, but the thrill and privilege of hearing their words and music sung out loud for the first time is singular.”

STANDOUT SCENE When Claire first arrives, nobody in the struggling town realizes her true intentions. Instead, they think she has returned to lend a helping hand. But when she dramatically reveals the nature of her visit and exposes the people from her past for who they really are, shock immediately morphs into a ripple effect of torn alliances, pointed fingers, and bloodlust. Meanwhile, as Claire deviously watches the town begin to unravel as a result of her announcement, she already basks in her victory – and thus gives Rivera one of the juiciest and most devious roles of her renowned career.


STARRING Vanessa Hudgens, Victoria Clark, Corey Cott, Dee Hoty, Howard McGillin, Steffanie Leigh

WHERE Neil Simon Theatre


STORY Another tale of romance in Paris based on a classic Leslie Caron film, Gigi tells the story of a young girl’s journey into womanhood at the turn of the 20th century. As she’s being groomed to be “perfect marriage material,” Gigi grows increasingly more interested in cinema, traveling, and speaking her mind. But when she and her lifelong friend realize the depth of their feelings for one another, will they live happily ever after or fall victim to the city of amour?

WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT Coupled with Catherine Zuber’s colorful costumes, Derek McLane’s art nouveau fortified set design makes for a gorgeous backdrop that bring early 1900’s Paris very much alive. The meticulous attention to detail allows audiences to feel like they’ve stepped into a Toulouse Lautrec painting. Plus, the music and lyrics of Alan Jay Learner and Frederick Loewe (My Fair Lady) are fully restored with songs from both the film and the original 1973 stage production, breathing new life into timeless numbers like “I Remember It Well,” “Thank Heaven for Little Girls,” and “It’s A Bore.”

STANDOUT SCENE The act one closer, “The Night They Invented Champagne,” is a celebratory and bubbly spectacle that makes Hudgens’ Broadway debut seem like something that should have happened long ago. It’s the show’s catchiest song (and rightfully the one chosen to be performed at the Tonys) and Hudgens shines as her title character begins her transformation from innocent little girl into a confident, modern woman.

Hand To God

STARRING Steven Boyer, Geneva Carr, Marc Kudisch, Sarah Stiles, Michael Oberholtzer

WHERE Booth Theatre


STORY Jason, a shy and quiet boy in a tiny religious town in Texas, deals with his beloved hand puppet, Tyrone, developing a foul-mouthed, unfiltered, and boisterous identity of its own. Acting as Jason’s voice when he doesn’t have one and getting him into trouble with everyone from the town pastor to the school bully to his crush to his mother, Tyrone flips Jason’s entire world upside down. But as Jason loses more and more control of Tyrone, what will the repercussions be for him and for those he’s terrorizing?

WHY YOU SHOULD SEE IT If Avenue Q and teen cult film Idle Hands had a child, this would be it. While not nearly as powerful as its Best Play competitor The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time, Hand to God is a jarring, crude and filthy examination of what happens when people repress their true feelings.

STANDOUT SCENE The first time that Jason realizes the extent of his powerlessness over Tyrone, actor Steven Boyer performs a full out screaming match with himself. After Jason tries to get rid of Tyrone, the puppet comes back with a vengeance, threatening him so that he will never attempt to free himself of him again. Lying in bed, Jason doesn’t know how to handle the small Tyrone towering over him and barking orders. He cowers in fear, completely surrendering to his creation.

Alex has been writing for PopBytes since 2011. As the Theater Editor, he primarily focuses on all aspects of Broadway, Off-Broadway, Regional Theater, and beyond. After growing up in Poland, Germany, and Russia, Alex spent several years living in New York before moving full-time to the Berkshires in Massachusetts. To read more from Alex, check out his blog, Headphone Infatuation, and follow him on Twitter @AlexNagorski.